Question by Ā§Guru PathikĀ§: What year in college can I take theoretical physics, and how often will I see these words?
Fractal
Consciousness
Lucidity
Einstein’s outlook on “Reality”
“The Measurement Problem”
Meditation
Spirituality
We are all one
Life greatest illusion-separation and self
Sacred Geometry
Fibonacci
Da Vinci
Platonism
Astral Projection
Metaphsyics
“Junk DNA”
9 dimensions
11 dimensions
Quatum
Metaphysics

ODU, is where I’m going , And I’m 17, if that’s relevant.

BQ: If I take theology, ( if you can’t tell I like learning about this stuff) will it be like the Religion and Spirituality( constant calling out and arguing), more than likely a theology professor would be an atheist right? ( I’d prefer to get a professor like Alan Watts ) Would he call me out if he found out I wasn’t atheist? I’m not a fundamental theist , but would I be stuck in a room full of atheists? I have atheist friends , but I’d hate to have to be silent just to avoid arguing.

Or opposite, would I get a religious teacher who would call me out for not being a fundamental theist?

BQ 2 : Which Could I take further ?
A: Major: Engineering, Minor: Theoretical physics
B: Major: Theoretical physics Minor: Engineering

BQ 3: Based of the list of words , what classes should I take?

BQ 4: As I said I’m 17, I was very passive in primary and secondary schools ( I’m really smart when I want to be, but if its something I’m not interested in, I’m lazy , and my grades will show) Going through the motions of my high school years I have cumulative 3.4 GPA, but If I didn’t study it or were apathetic about it in high school, would I be a complete noob in theoretical physics and quatum physics?.

When I was younger I had no interest in most school subjects whatsoever , but now I do.
Ok, thanks I probably was confused by some words of Michio Kaku pertaining to theoretical physics and Spinoza.

Best answer:

Answer by Cyle Monroe
If choosing to go with either a major in Engineering or TP, I would suggest you take Engineering. The marketability and demand of just about any engineering degree is already known to be higher than average, where as TP is a bit more obscure as it is based around theory.

Once you are in college, you can no longer have the mindset of “well this is boring!” and tune out like you can in most of high school. If you are taking on a degree in any engineering, which is widely known to be very math-intense and demanding of your attention, you will need to be “interested” or you WILL fall behind. And as a previous engineering student I can assure you, you will have lecture upon lecture about subjects which will NOT peak any of your interests unless you are oddly passionate about calculus limits, derivatives, or the diameter of a sewage pipe.
I have no idea about your questions about that list of what I assume to be your interests.
Good luck in school.

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