Jun 182014
 

Question by aditi3333: Looking for grants for phd in neuroscience degree.?
Hello, I am planning on going to school next year to start my phd in neuroscience and need grants to help me afford going to school. I have never applied to any grants before and am a minority female and want to find as many as I can. Please help me if you are familiar with the process, just starting out and need to know where to look. Thanks

Best answer:

Answer by Shannon
omg i am a psych major and i LOVE neuroscience. But anywho! have you tried fasfa.com!? they give out grants. other then that, you could try to get a loan from a bank. I havent had much luck. Im a female (white) and all i could get were loans. Its hard out there these days!

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Jun 172014
 

Question by vanessa: do you understand that neuroscience has already proven that afterlife is impossible?
if that part of the bible is a lie than what’s the point of believing the rest?
because thought processes cannot be created without a host like the body from air alone, i’m looking forward to that day when neuroscience proves that feelings and thought processes can be created from air alone or a piece of rock or space matter or whatever **** because that day will never come and neuroscience has already proven that you need a body to create thought processes and without it you can’t.
source is every book and study related to neuroscience and the conclusion that thought processes cannot be created from air alone is mine but i’m sure there’s already been many studies that prove this to be correct that thougth processes cannot be created from air alone.
oh please J.P to have an afterlife all you need to do is prove that thought processes can be created without the body……..and they cannot be created from air alone or a piece of a plant of some space stuff, if how every these things could create thought processes than i guess i’d be wrong but i highly doubt it.
* if however these things could be created without, sorry be spelling’s crazy as usual.
‘common’ why thank you for the link, i’ll be sure to do that.

Best answer:

Answer by Suze
How has neuroscience proven that? I think that’s a crock, and I don’t even know if god exists or not!!!

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Jun 022014
 

Question by Cade: What is a career in Neuroscience like? ANYONE with neuro experience please!?
What is a career in Neuroscience like? ANYONE with neuro experience please!?
IN CLASS what should I expect? A lot of reading? Memorization? Hands on? How many years does it usually take before you are in a lab and able to work on research? Is the field competitive? I want to do lab research. Is the pay good (although not in it for the pay) and finally how math heavy is it and what can I do now as a new college student taking basic classes to prepare myself?

Interested in neurophysiology branch
Sorry first half got cut off. Basically I said when I think of neuroscience first thing that comes to mind are those 3D animations you always see on tv shows.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5SHc67Hep48

I have no other real experience of working in a lab I never took those sort of classes in grade school.

Best answer:

Answer by Talono
I don’t know much about neuroscience, but I do know a few general things:

If you expect to do any kind of science-related research work, it will always be math heavy.

Biology is always especially heavy on memorization.

There really is no time requirement to start research. Since you’re in college, you can start research as an undergraduate through your college’s mentoring programs, various undergraduate research programs across the country, or by asking a professor. Afterwards, you can go to Grad school to do more research. After Grad school, you’ll probably do a postdoc or go into industry. If you’re really good, you can get hired by a university.

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May 292014
 

Question by fishing4squirrels: How important is genetics for a neuroscience degree?
For my degree course my first year of neuroscience is basically the same as a first year biology student. So I was wondering how important the different segments of biology will be for my second and third year. I do an entire module based on genetics, and another one giving a general human biological overview starting from cells working up to organs and systems. Are these actually going to be beneficial in my later years or do they simply want me to have a general overview? Should I focus mainly on action potentials, cell signaling, and the brain? (or other areas – open to suggestions) and just get enough knowledge to pass the rest? My theory is that they want me to have an overview of human biology and also don’t have enough information/money (not sure which) to bother teaching separate neuroscience and biology lectures. Any help, hints, or suggestions are very welcome.

Best answer:

Answer by Emily M
Considering the genetic basis of certain neurological diseases (Huntington comes to mind), I would think that knowledge of genetics and molecular biology would be essential for neuroscience. Also, the nervous system interacts with just about all other parts of the body, so, for example, you will need to know how muscles work in order to really understand the neuromuscular junction.

IMHO, you will need basic biology, cell physiology, mammalian anatomy and physiology, pharmacology if offered (particularly drugs affecting the CNS and peripheral nerves), immunology, biochemistry (for which you need general and organic chemistry), biophysics (for which you need physics), and psychology. In math, you will definitely need statistics and probably need calculus and maybe some computer science, particularly if you are also interested in cognitive science. Developmental biology and endocrinology would be useful too.

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May 272014
 

Question by mermaid: in simple world what is Cognitive neuroscience looking into?
I know its a mix of psycology and neuroscience, but is it lookign into human act a certain ways cuz of the cells in them?

Like what is is it?

Best answer:

Answer by M
Cognitive neuroscience helps create a better understanding for chemical and psychological mechanisms for learning.

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May 152014
 

Question by Eszter: What are good graduate programs for systems neuroscience?
I’m going to apply for graduate school in a few years and my research interests lie in systems neuroscience, could you recommend graduate programs or professors for me to look in to? I am currently a neuroscience major at the University of Texas at Austin.

Best answer:

Answer by Olga
There are very strong neuroscience programs in Northwestern University, UCSD, Columbia University, Oregon Health & Science University, and U of Michigan Ann Arbor.

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May 132014
 

Question by : What can neuroscience tell us about individual differences in intelligence?

Best answer:

Answer by Ano Nymous
1. location of brain activity for various tasks (i.e. which structures are involved in what)…pretty standard actually but some differences in left-handed vs right-hand people, certain mental disorders (i.e. enlarged ventricles in schizophrenia), brain damage/neurological disorders/trauma/anything medical that might affect the brain/individual’s plasticity

2. which neurotransmitters enhance or inhibit intelligence; optimal levels

3. contributing factors to intelligence and various types of intelligence (i.e. tendency for long-term potentiation or the neuroscience term for the process of “learning”)

4. How all these things might function differently in different people to produce similar or dissimilar results

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May 052014
 

Question by Brittany D: is neuroscience extremely hard?
i’m not in college yet, but i will be soon. im thinking about going to a small liberal arts school, and i want to study neuroscience. my uncle, on my moms side, and my cousin, on my dads side, have both died in the past year due to problems with their brains. i want to do neuroscience because i want to help people that need help like my uncle and cousin. im scared to take the course, though, because im scared im not smart enough. i thought i would like astronomy, and i took it, and it’s too hard and i dont understand it. but i have always had a desire to take like psychology and something in nuerscience. i don’t want to be one on one with a patient, i’d rather do research or something. is it really really hard? im so scared to take it.

Best answer:

Answer by waterlily3422
I would imagine there would be plenty to study for. :)

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Apr 222014
 

Question by : neuroscience question about memory?
does anyone know what region of the memory banks people use to remember vocabulary? I am guessing it’s different from the one you use when you regurgitate information for a test that you take in college because you are trying to recall something u have known before that u didn’t premeditate on prior to you using your sentence you are either speaking or writing. I have known before that there is a long-term and short-term memory. But the region of memory for words where you have to remember something seems to be different when it comes to language or sentence structuring. So for any neuroscience experts here or for anyone who known, please let me know?

Best answer:

Answer by Beavis Comeavis
Broca’s area is responsible for speech and that is in the parietal lobe. This is in the left half of the brain for right handed people and most of the time in the right half for left handed people.

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Apr 192014
 

Question by Great Dane: If I am interested in Medicine, and Neuroscience as well, which following options should I go for:?
1) Medicine, then go for Neurology (Neurology is not the same as neuroscience right? Neuroscience is more towards research?)
2) Take Neuroscience as a first degree, then enter Medicine graduate programme
3) Medicine / Neuroscience alone is enough, two degrees won’t do any good

Best answer:

Answer by eri
Major in neuroscience and take the premed classes. Then you’ll have the option of going to medical school to possibly go into neurology, or to graduate school to become a neuroscientist instead.

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