Jun 152014
 

Question by stonesfan_17: What could you do with a double major in computer science and physics/aerospace engineering?
Right now I’m in my second semester of my computer science degree. During these 2 semesters I’ve had to do research for my english comp class. From this research I have noticed I am greatly interested in AI programming and space type topics.

So just out of curiosity I’m trying to find out some information on how a double major in either physics or aerospace engineering would bring me closer to this field of work. Mainly the goal would be NASA, which seems obvious for this type of work.

At this time physics seems to be the most practical considering I already have to take around 15 credit hours of science classes (physics can be used for this) for my computer science degree so that would be easy to turn into a BS physics degree. On the other hand aerospace engineering seems like it would be more of an eye catcher on a resume. The only down side to this would be having to transferring schools since my current one does not offer a degree in it.

So is this career path worthwhile? Will a double major help in securing a job or is it just a time/money sink? And will the degrees even work together?(I know designing software for an aerospace system would benefit from that degree…but would you actually put the knowledge to good use instead of just using it as background knowledge for understanding the requirements for the software)

Basically my education path can take 3 routes by this:

A: Complete computer science degree and be done with it. Most likely with a mathematics or physics minor.

B: Computer science degree + physics degree.

C: Computer science degree + physics minor, then transfer schools for an aerospace degree(assuming enough credits transfer and the degree can be gotta in an additional 1-2 years).

Best answer:

Answer by Andy
I would keep on the Computer Science / Engineering route and you’ll do very well!

With that background you could work with me…
I work on GPS space systems for a large defense contractor. All our electronic systems are software driven. To do this job you must know both fields to excel. The age where you could specialize in hardware or software are over, to make it today you have to be a jack of all things geeky.

While you are at it get a Management Graduate degree and you’ll be very successful if you have ambition!

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Mar 142014
 

Question by Ciaran: Do I need A – level physics for engineering?
Im doing a level next year and I am in two minds on which subjects to study. I have three courses in mind that i would like to study at university, engineering(mechanical or else aerospace), medicine or else computer science. Subjects that I would like to study next year would be maths, chemistry, biology and one other subject(not yet decided). I am studying chemistry because it is required for medicine and biology because it is preferred for medicine. I am studying maths because it is required for engineering and computer science. Im not sure wether or not to study physics for my fourth subject, as it is very difficult and im not sure if I can cope with the work load of maths and the 3 sciences. However saying that, maths and physics are my favourite subjects. But I was unable to study additional maths at my school for gcse because it was not available, so i may struggle with a level maths next year, and physics could add to that pressure. At gcse i am predicted to get an A/A* at maths and a AA at double award science. So basically my question is do i need a level physics to study engineering or computer science at university? I know its not required but it is preferred. Will i be at a disadvantage if i dont do it? Bear in mind that i am not entirely sure wether or not that i will do engineering or computer science. It depends on my results. All answers are welcome and i appreciate honest advice. Thank you :)

Best answer:

Answer by cathrl69
“I have three courses in mind that i would like to study at university, engineering(mechanical or else aerospace), medicine or else computer science.”

Then you take physics, chemistry and double maths.

No question. Any other combination would be insane.

“At gcse i am predicted to get an A/A* at maths and a AA at double award science.”

Ah…in that case you may as well stop worrying about the medicine requirements, I’m afraid. You’re not a strong enough candidate.

What do you think? Answer below!

Aug 172013
 

Question by ocean flyer: What is it easier for me to get a job in, Mechanical Engineering or Computer Science? (Applied Math student)?
I am an Applied Math student. I like computer science and mechanical engineering equally. I need to know what is easier for me to get a job in. My goal is to work at a company using math to solve problems and do research involved with hard science (biology, chemistry, physics, etc.). Thank you.
I am good at programming.

Best answer:

Answer by Micheal
d*mn you good in math, so youre pretty much set in any job you want bruh

What do you think? Answer below!

Apr 292013
 

Question by Kim: Can you use a biomedical engineering major to go to medical school?
I know that med school requirements are basically biology, chemistry, physics, calculus and english. I would like to know if I majored in biomedical engineering if i could use that to go to medical school and eventually become a neurologist. I know there are neuroscience and biology majors out there, but I just want to have a useful degree if I decide to change my mind at the end of the four years.

Best answer:

Answer by steam3
kil

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Jan 062013
 

Question by ocean flyer: Should I pursue computer science or mechanical engineering?
I am an Applied Math major student. The problem is that both fields interest me. My goal is to use mathematics in the real world (problem solving/research) particularly in the hard sciences (biology, chemistry, physics,etc.)/engineering. I already took many courses in hard sciences (biology,chemistry,physics,etc.). What field should I go to for best job security and most opportunities? Thank you.

Best answer:

Answer by PE2008
Consider Engineering Physics or Engineering Mechanics.

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Dec 262012
 

Question by Y2H: After I finish Engineering school what do I have to do to prepare a PhD in science?
After I graduate from Engineering school and get masters degree in Electronic Engineering, is it possible to do post-graduate studies in Science school branches like Physics or Mathematics? Will I be bale to study for PhD in Physics/Math directly or will I have to get another Masters degree in Physics/Math first?

Best answer:

Answer by eri
You’re almost certainly not going to be able to enter a PhD program in physics from a masters in engineering. The majority of PhD programs require you pass a qualifying exam before beginning work on your PhD, and the exam covers graduate-level physics coursework in classical mechanics, thermodynamics, electromagnetics, and quantum mechanics – at the least. And the coursework at the masters level assumes you majored in physics in college – it’s not starting at the beginning; it assumes prior knowledge. If you want a masters in physics to be an option, make sure to take the minimum coursework in physics before applying – probably at least 2 semesters of intro physics, and one each of modern physics, classical mechanics, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, and quantum mechanics.

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Dec 262012
 

Question by Brandon: What high school classes to take for engineering?
I am planning to be a engineer (electrical) or (biomedical)! and i am unsure of what classes to take!

Possible classes are
-math
calculus ab
calculus bc
statistics

-science
Chemistry
Biology
Physics
Anatomy

Please help! (please make separate lists for both.)
Thanks =)
dont be afraid to suggest other classes i did not list

Best answer:

Answer by Ariel
Well, for biomedical i think all of the sciences you listed are important. As for math, calculus ab and bc are very similar, but bc is a little tougher and covers a bit more than ab. it’d be better to take calculus than statistics though. As for electrical engineering, biology and anatomy aren’t that important, but physics is a must for that.

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Apr 132012
 

Question by Invisible: Where do I buy the manual solution book of Serway`s Physics for science and engineering?
Does it shows the solutions of every problem?

Best answer:

Answer by golffan137
you should be able to buy it online or at your bookstore, I happen to have it and it only shows select solutions, I did’nt find it very helpful..

What do you think? Answer below!

Aug 152011
 

Question by computer guy 94: Which looks better a double major in computer science and physics or a major in computer engineering?

Best answer:

Answer by Dan
As a computer engineer (assuming you meet your state’s requirements) you would be qualified to do consulting work. However, being qualified is often not necessary if you are employed by larger firms.

Give your answer to this question below!

Jul 172011
 

Question by Plato: What career combines engineering and neuroscience?
I was wondering:
Is there a career(s) in which engineering and neuroscience are both combined?
Thanks.

Best answer:

Answer by Vulcan
Probably the study of nano-technology. That’s going to be HUGE at some point. Maybe it already is.

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